Jesson Bradshaw

CEO at Energy Ogre

Jesson Bradshaw is the CEO of Energy Ogre, an electricity management company that uses proprietary systems to ensure its customers are always getting the best prices on their energy electricity.

Energy Ogre has helped over 100,000 Texans save up to 40% on their electricity bills, over $150M since its founding. 

Jesson hopes to bring attention to Texas’s deregulated electricity industry by discussing topics such as renewable energy, future technologies, and consumer services.

Jesson’s network is over 15k, and he would be happy to let them know to listen in!

read more

BOOK NOW FOR your podcast

Jesson Bradshaw

CEO at Energy Ogre

Jesson Bradshaw is the CEO of Energy Ogre, an electricity management company that uses proprietary systems to ensure its customers are always getting the best prices on their energy electricity.

Energy Ogre has helped over 100,000 Texans save up to 40% on their electricity bills, over $150M since its founding. 

Jesson hopes to bring attention to Texas’s deregulated electricity industry by discussing topics such as renewable energy, future technologies, and consumer services.

Jesson’s network is over 15k, and he would be happy to let them know to listen in!

read more

BOOK NOW FOR your podcast

Jesson Bradshaw

CEO at Energy Ogre

Jesson Bradshaw is the CEO of Energy Ogre, an electricity management company that uses proprietary systems to ensure its customers are always getting the best prices on their energy electricity.

Energy Ogre has helped over 100,000 Texans save up to 40% on their electricity bills, over $150M since its founding. 

Jesson hopes to bring attention to Texas’s deregulated electricity industry by discussing topics such as renewable energy, future technologies, and consumer services.

Jesson’s network is over 15k, and he would be happy to let them know to listen in!

read more

As seen on

Energy Ogre has about 100,000 customers. CEO and co-founder Jesson Bradshaw sees plenty of opportunity for growth by encouraging more consumers to shop for power. A few minutes of research, he said, can lower a family’s bills by hundreds of dollars a year. But too many consumers are still not paying attention.

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Worried about making ends meet? Energy Ogre CEO explains the details of a program that may help you.

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Career Timeline

1995

Jesson’s Career in Energy Begins

After studying economics in college, Jesson begins trading power in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC), Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and Southeast Electric Reliability Council (SERC) for NGC Corporation, one of the top energy companies in the U.S. In this role, Jesson trades wholesale electricity (natural gas and coal, too) in a similar way that a stockbroker trades on Wall Street. 

His job is to manage electricity (buy and sell), maximizing profits on the electricity NGC Corporation generates. Electricity is unlike traditional commodities such as water and gold because it cannot be stored and then used when needed.

It is the ultimate “just-in-time” commodity. However, despite its differences, electricity is still traded similarly to other commodities.

1995

1999

Assumes Commercial Responsibilities for Dynegy

Jesson takes over some of the commercial operation of the midwest power plants owned by Dynegy, formerly known as NGC Corporation. Essentially, Jesson is now in charge of running each plant as its own business, making all subsequent decisions in a wide range of areas.

Within this role, Jesson learns the true ins and out of the electricity business, adding onto his prior knowledge of wholesale trading. Now, equipped with the right knowledge and approximately eight years of energy experience, he leaves Dynegy to start his own business.

1999

2003

Co-Founds Fulcrum Energy

Fulcrum Energy’s focus is based upon commercially managing generation resources (power plants) nationwide with a particular focus on ERCOT. Within its portfolio, Fulcrum owned both generation assets and retail electricity providers.

Fulcrum was able to fill a void left open within the energy sector by companies like Enron and a few others after they either went bankrupt or dissolved as a company. From then on, Fulcrum began serving third party assets (power plants) that other companies commercially managed in the past.

Years later in 2011, Fulcrum sold its retail electricity businesses, Tara Energy, Amigo Energy, and Smart Prepaid Electric, to Just Energy Corporation. After ensuring a smooth transition for those three retail businesses, Jesson set his sights on a new opportunity within the electricity industry.

2003

2013

Co-Founds Energy Ogre

What started off as a 5 employee operation grew into a nationally recognized, award-winning company that revolutionized the way Texans buy electricity. Energy Ogre is an electricity management company that uses proprietary technology to find tailor-made plans for their members. 

These plans, sometimes offering exclusive, below-market prices, make the most sense for how much electricity they use. Energy Ogre manages the entire contract process, including renewals, and handles any issues that may arise—saving their members time and money. 

Energy Ogre is a private organization headquartered in Houston with 83 employees as of February 2021. In 2019, Energy Ogre was ranked by Inc. Magazine as the 240th fastest growing company in the United States.

Since its founding, Energy Ogre has disrupted the Texas electricity scene by more than $150 million by always finding cheaper plans for its member base. On average Energy Ogre members save up to 40% and $750 in their first year.

As Energy Ogre looks to expand its services and provide additional value, the company is actively working on ways to help homeowners manage their electricity demand.

2013

Ask me

Should the average person be afraid that their jobs will be taken by AI and machine learning technology? If not, how should people consider what this technology can and cannot do?
Why do so many people overpay for electricity and don’t even know it?
How do Texans know if they are at a good rate, and how often should they change providers?
We’ve seen several electricity providers offer incentives with their plans including Free Nights and Solar Days, Gift Cards, and free Tech Gadgets. Would I be correct in saying in this case, nothing is free?
What does the future look like for renewable energy and battery storage capacity? How will electricity prices and traditional energy sources be impacted?

Podcast agent: Steve Maher

steve@kitcaster.com